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Deprivation index for health in Canada in 2001

This map represents the Canada-wide deprivation index, which was mapped according to three levels of analysis: Canadian, regional and metropolitan variations. >>>

Automatically, the map below represents the Canadian variations of the deprivation index. To see the Canadian regional variations or the metropolitan variations of the deprivation index, go to the right side of the map and select the desired geographic level in the geographical information layers control. Select only one geographical level at a time.

Methodological guide "The material and social deprivation index: a summary" (INSPQ Web Site)
version française

Cartographie

Indicateurs > Défavorisation (2001) > cartographie
Canadian variations of the deprivation index in 2001

Réalisation : MSSS, Direction de la gestion intégrée de l'information.
Collaboration : Institut national de santé publique du Québec.
Source : Statistics Canada, census of 2001.

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Take a look >

Visit "Deprivation index, Canada, 2001" in the Santéscope section of the INSPQ Website by clicking here. You will find :

- multiple tables of statistical data that distribute the Canadian population by age group and by sex for both material and social deprivation;
- Deprivation index assignment program;
- Equivalence table between the dissemination / enumeration areas and the different geographic territories;
- Publications about the use and methodology of the deprivation index.

Glossary >

> Canadian Regional Variations


The regional variations compare the deprivation differences between the populations of dissemination areas for five different areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies and British Columbia) which are considered separately. The three Canadian territories were not considered in the regional variations because they have too small a population to be statistically significant.

Source:

Ministry of Health and Social Services and INSPQ
For more information, contact us: atlas@msss.gouv.qc.ca

> Canadian variations


The Canadian variations compare the deprivation differences between the populations of dissemination areas for all of Canada.

Source:

Ministry of Health and Social Services and INSPQ
For more information, contact us: atlas@msss.gouv.qc.ca

> Census Metropolitan Area


In Canada, there are 27 Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) which are formed by one or more adjacent municipalities centred on a large urban area (known as the urban core). The census population count of the urban core is at least 100,000 to form a census metropolitan area. To be included in census metropolitan area, other adjacent municipalities must have a high degree of integration with the central urban area, as measured by commuting flows derived from census place of work data.

Source:

Statistics Canada
Cartographic Boundary Files, Census 2001, October 2002

> Census Subdivision


In Canada, there are 5,600 census subdivisions for the 2001 Census. Census subdivision is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (for example, Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories).

Source:

Statistics Canada
Cartographic Boundary Files, Census 2001, October 2002


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> Dissemination Areas


The Dissemination Areas Cartographic Boundary File for Canada contains 52,943 disseminations areas for the 2001 census. The dissemination area (DA) is a small, relatively stable geographic unit composed of one or more blocks. It is the smallest standard geographic area for which all census data are disseminated. Dissemination areas cover all the territory of Canada.

Source:

Statistics Canada
Cartographic Boundary Files, Census 2001, October 2002

> Enumeration Areas


The Enumeration Area was the smallest standard geographic area for the 1996 Census. Since 2001, the dissemination area has been replacing the enumeration area.

Source:

Statistics Canada
Cartographic Boundary Files, Census 2001, October 2002

> Health Region


In the province of Quebec, there are 18 health regions (région sociosanitaire in French). Health and Social Services Agencies are responsible to organize services on these health regions territories.

Source:

Ministry of Health and Social Services and INSPQ
For more information, contact us: atlas@msss.gouv.qc.ca

> Metropolitan variations


The metropolitan variations compare the deprivation differences between the populations of dissemination areas for three different census metropolitan areas (Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver) which are considered separately.

Source:

Ministry of Health and Social Services and INSPQ
For more information, contact us: atlas@msss.gouv.qc.ca

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